Rio Grande, Taos, New Mexico
Rio Grande, Taos ©Author Adventures

The ranch in Taos where author and poet D.H. Lawrence lived in the early 1920s opened to public guests in 2014. It is approximately a 45-minute drive on a gravelly road jutting away from the main highway in Taos. Information about the ranch can be found at https://dhlawrenceranch.unm.edu/d.h.-lawrence-ranch/index.html. The ranch has several buildings to see and a memorial containing the writer’s ashes. The property grounds are small, have limited hours and offer a peaceful, retreat-like atmosphere.

D.H. Lawrence was a prolific writer from England who came to the United States later in life. He published novels and poetry. Much of it can be downloaded for free from www.gutenberg.org. Regarding poetry, especially the writings from his New Mexico period, Britannica.com states “…his most original contribution is Birds, Beasts and Flowers (1923), in which he creates an unprecedented poetry of nature, based on his experiences of the Mediterranean scene and the American Southwest.”

You can read more about the writer through the University of Nottingham website at nottingham.ac.uk/research/groups/dhlawrence and locate his writings connected to Taos through dhlawrenceranch.unm.edu/d.h.-lawrence-ranch/writings-by-d.h.-lawrence-in-taos.html.

When driving to Taos, we recommend aiming for a weekday morning. Traffic to this tucked away vacation area can be heavy on weekends, especially during snow season as it is a popular ski resort location. A narrow and windy mountain road takes you into town. A visitor’s center is available near the entrance to help travelers spark ideas for recreation, most of which will be outdoors, and create itineraries.

When Taos is busy, restaurant lines can be long. We recommend stocking up on food, beverages and supplies before beginning the trip, along with your D.H. Lawrence books.

The first home where D.H. Lawrence stayed in the United States was Witter Bynner‘s place, centrally located in Santa Fe (south of Taos). Now known as the “Inn of the Turquoise Bear,” we stayed in the same lovely room as the writer did nearly 100 years before. The owners of this establishment are knowledgeable of its rich history and are happy to share their expertise and hospitality while maintaining an overall tranquil environment. Read more about it here: Inn of the Turquoise Bear.

This is the final destination of our New Mexico Trail!

Patricia Smart